Moderate Moment | Moderate Moms

Archive for April, 2013

Frittatas with bacon and potatos

So, even the resident beige-a-tarian, my 13 year old son, actually ate my dinner tonight. Pork chops with baked apples and vermicelli. Notice all foods were on the color spectrum of white to beige. But still, I am feeling emboldened and so, tomorrow night, I am going to make these frittatas. Wish me luck. I am going to hide some good stuff (as in good for you) inside. My hope is the first bite will taste so good, he won’t notice the as-yet-unnamed vegetables i am going to sneak inside? 

From Cooking Light: 

  • 2 cups finely chopped peeled baking potato (about 12 ounces)
  • 5 bacon slices (uncooked)
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped sweet onion
  • 1 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh chives, divided
  • 2 tablespoons grated fresh Parmesan cheese $
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 7 large egg whites, lightly beaten $
  • 3 large eggs, lightly beaten $
  • Cooking spray
  • 6 tablespoons fat-free sour cream $

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 375°.
  2. Place potato in a medium saucepan; cover with water. Bring to a boil; cook 4 minutes or until almost tender. Drain.
  3. Cook bacon in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until crisp. Remove bacon from pan, reserving 2 teaspoons drippings in pan. Crumble bacon; set aside. Add potato, onion, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and thyme to drippings in pan; cook 8 minutes or until potato is lightly brown over medium-high heat. Remove from heat; cool.
  4. Combine the potato mixture, bacon, remaining 3/4 teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons chives, cheese, pepper, egg whites, and eggs, stirring well with a whisk. Coat 36 mini muffin cups with cooking spray. Spoon about 1 tablespoon egg mixture into each muffin cup. Bake at 375° for 16 minutes or until lightly brown. Cool 5 minutes on a wire rack. Remove frittatas from muffin cups. Top each with 1/2 teaspoon sour cream and 1/2 teaspoon chives.
Note:

Prepare the frittatas a day ahead, chill, and reheat them just before serving. You can also freeze them for up to a month. Run a sharp knife around the edges of the muffin cups to loosen them from the pans. If you don’t have a mini-muffin pan, you can cook the frittata in a 13 x 9-inch pan at 375° for 15 minutes and cut into 36 squares.

MyRecipes is working with Let’s Move!, the Partnership for a Healthier America, and USDA’s MyPlate to give anyone looking for healthier options access to a trove of recipes that will help them create healthy, tasty plates. For more information about creating a healthy plate, visit www.choosemyplate.gov.

David Bonom, Cooking Light 

The Hormone Horoscope

The Hormone Horoscope

You have to pity men who like their women feminine but are thrown for a total loop by the hormones that keep us that way! Now along comes an App that a lot of them are buying from Itunes as a way of hedging their bets. Is it a fat day? Is she going to cry if you look at her the wrong way? Is she going to snap at something you said, however well intentioned? Well, now, at the touch of a button, you can dial into the hormone horoscope. It’s an app available on Itunes. Think of it like a mood ring, only much more accurate, according to users. And their loved ones 🙂 

Mood Horoscope by Mark Erdmann 

Mood Horoscope isn’t your everyday horoscope! It uses the most up-to-date scientific research on hormones to predict your moods, food cravings, energy levels, productivity, sex life, and even the strength of your immune system. Live your best life according to your hormones!

HIGHLIGHTS
– 100% free daily horoscope for each day of your cycle
– New Weight Loss Pack with diet and fitness tips tailored to your hormone levels!
– Many women tell us it’s scary how accurate the predictions are
– Men also use the app to better understand their girlfriends/wives
– Includes practical tips for making the best of your day
– Easy to use, with a beautiful, colorful design
– Horoscopes written by a woman for women, based on scientific research

HOW IT WORKS
Start by entering the first day of your last period. That’s it! Every day, you’ll get a new horoscope based on the day of your cycle. It’s all about rising and falling Estrogen and Progesterone levels throughout the month. Modern science has shown these hormones have a huge impact on every area of a woman’s life, but women of course have known this all along! Mood Horoscope assumes an average 28 Day cycle, with ovulation on Day 14. You might not be on this exact schedule, but the general pattern will be the same (plus or minus a few days). Please email us if you have any questions – tatiana@mobilecurious.com.

WHAT WOMEN ARE SAYING
Mood Horoscope gets rave reviews! Here are just a few pieces of feedback we’ve received:

Amazing 
“I got this app for my wife since she doesn’t have an iPhone. She loves it. It’s super simple to use and she is loving knowing how her hormones affect her mood on a daily basis.” — Chrismanfrank 

So validating! 
“This app is brilliant, it helps my body make complete sense and in only a very short time I am so much more aware of what is happening for me in a hormonal sense. Thanks to this app I have been able to cut myself some slack on those low hormone days leading up to my period. Wonderful!” — Ms_Belsey 

Great app! 
“The mood horoscopes I get are surprisingly detailed and accurate. I set mine to push my horoscope every morning. It is a great was to start the day! Simple, fun, and interesting!” — Lhbf

What’s New in Version 1.42

– Fix for a notifications bug.
– Name change! A trademark was filed for the name “Hormone Horoscope” and we don’t have the resources to license the name. We are so thankful for your support, and we hope you like the new name. We’ll have more exciting updates coming soon. 🙂

…More

Screenshots

iPhone Screenshot 1
iPhone Screenshot 2
iPhone Screenshot 3
iPhone Screenshot 4

Customer Reviews

Love it!!! 
     

by Tortle58

I really love this app but I wish there was a way to change the length of your cycle…. It would make a difference in your horoscope making it more accurate 😉

Spot on 
     

by Harry Bergeron

I usually just go by how my body feels but its nice to know what it’s actually doing during the cycle.

Great way to start my day 
     

by weens11

This app is accurate. Love it.

Mood Horoscope

Mood Horoscope isn’t your everyday horoscope! It uses the most up-to-date scientific research on hormones to predict your moods, food cravings, energy levels, productivity, sex life, and even the strength of your immune system. Live your best life according to your hormones!

HIGHLIGHTS
– 100% free daily horoscope for each day of your cycle
– New Weight Loss Pack with diet and fitness tips tailored to your hormone levels!
– Many women tell us it’s scary how accurate the predictions are
– Men also use the app to better understand their girlfriends/wives
– Includes practical tips for making the best of your day
– Easy to use, with a beautiful, colorful design
– Horoscopes written by a woman for women, based on scientific research

HOW IT WORKS
Start by entering the first day of your last period. That’s it! Every day, you’ll get a new horoscope based on the day of your cycle. It’s all about rising and falling Estrogen and Progesterone levels throughout the month. Modern science has shown these hormones have a huge impact on every area of a woman’s life, but women of course have known this all along! Mood Horoscope assumes an average 28 Day cycle, with ovulation on Day 14. You might not be on this exact schedule, but the general pattern will be the same (plus or minus a few days). Please email us if you have any questions – tatiana@mobilecurious.com.

WHAT WOMEN ARE SAYING
Mood Horoscope gets rave reviews! Here are just a few pieces of feedback we’ve received:

Amazing 
“I got this app for my wife since she doesn’t have an iPhone. She loves it. It’s super simple to use and she is loving knowing how her hormones affect her mood on a daily basis.” — Chrismanfrank 

So validating! 
“This app is brilliant, it helps my body make complete sense and in only a very short time I am so much more aware of what is happening for me in a hormonal sense. Thanks to this app I have been able to cut myself some slack on those low hormone days leading up to my period. Wonderful!” — Ms_Belsey 

Great app! 
“The mood horoscopes I get are surprisingly detailed and accurate. I set mine to push my horoscope every morning. It is a great was to start the day! Simple, fun, and interesting!” — Lhbf

 

Customer Reviews
Love it!!! 
     

by Tortle58

I really love this app but I wish there was a way to change the length of your cycle…. It would make a difference in your horoscope making it more accurate 😉

Spot on 
     
by Harry Bergeron

I usually just go by how my body feels but its nice to know what it’s actually doing during the cycle.

Great way to start my day      

by weens11

This app is accurate. Love it.

Are Americans ready to pay taxes on Amazon.com?

By /NYT

 

WASHINGTON — Legislation that would force Internet retailers to collect sales taxes from their customers has put antitax and small-government activists like Grover Norquist’s Americans for Tax Reform and the Heritage Foundation in an unusual position: they’re losing.

 For years, conservative Republican lawmakers have been influenced heavily by the antitax activists in Washington, who have dictated outcomes and become the arbiters of what is and is not a tax increase. But on the question of Internet taxation, their voices have begun to be drowned out by the pleas of struggling retailers back home who complain that their online competitors enjoy an unfair price advantage.

Representative Scott Rigell, Republican of Virginia, calls them “the hardworking men and women who have mortgaged their homes to buy or to rent a little brick-and-mortar shop.”

And each time Mr. Norquist and others in the antitax lobby take a loss, they start to seem more vulnerable, Republican lawmakers acknowledge, with ramifications for the continuing fights on the deficit and the shape of the tax code.

“I have a lot of constituents saying to me, ‘Grover Norquist did not elect you,’ ” said Representative Steve Womack, Republican of Arkansas and the author of the Internet tax bill in the House. “Members that come to Washington and kowtow to special interests end up contributing to this very polarized government. These are tough decisions we have to make up here.”

The legislation cleared its final procedural hurdle Thursday evening on a bipartisan Senate vote, 63 to 30. Final Senate passage is scheduled for May 6, and that tally is likely to be even more strongly in favor. Earlier test votes won as many as 75 yeses. And House action, once seemingly unthinkable, may be unstoppable.

“I have some concern about the legislation,” said Representative Bob Goodlatte of Virginia, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, which has jurisdiction on the issue, “but we also recognize the fairness issue — certain items being taxed in certain circumstances, other items being not — is a problem for brick-and-mortar businesses, so we’re going to try and solve that.”

The Marketplace Fairness Act would allow state governments to force Internet retailers to collect sales taxes from their customers and remit the proceeds to state and local governments, just as brick-and-mortar retailers have done for decades. The states would be required to provide free software that would be embedded in retail Web sites to do the calculations.

Mr. Norquist, whose organization maintains the antitax pledge that virtually every Republican in Washington has signed, calls it the “Let People in Alabama Loot People in New York Act.” To him, the bill is a money grab by cash-poor state and local governments that would get the power to tax consumers who do not have the power to vote them out of office.

“It reduces the pressure on governments to offer the best services at the lowest cost,” he said in an interview. “We think it’s a very, very bad idea.”

His group has suggested that a yes would violate the taxpayers’ pledge, although Mr. Norquist has been cautious about whether passage of the law would constitute a tax increase, since consumers are already supposed to pay sales taxes even if a merchant does not collect it.

The Heritage Foundation and its more overt political arm, Heritage Action, have made no such equivocations. It is making a yes vote a black mark for a lawmaker on Heritage’s conservative scorecard, urging its members to call their representatives and senators, “pretty much everything we can,” said Dan Holler, a spokesman for Heritage Action.

Many Republicans have just shrugged. Supporters of the bill include Tea Partyconservatives like Senator Ron Johnson, Republican of Wisconsin, and Republican leaders like Senator John Thune of South Dakota. They argue that the bill, which could generate as much as $24 billion in new tax revenues, is not a tax increase at all. It only ensures that taxes already owed are actually paid. Most states collect 4 to 7 percent on retail purchases.

“It’s obviously an issue that can be divisive for Republicans because a lot of the antitax groups are weighing in against it,” Senator Thune said. “But in states like mine where you’ve got a lot of smaller retailers trying to compete in smaller communities, people are going to do their business online, and that has grown dramatically over the last few years.”

The real pull has come from personal experiences back home, and the emergence of reliable Republican business voices who have provided a rare counterargument to the activists in Washington.

For Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri, it is a bridal shop in St. Louis where customers try on dresses, check the labels for the product code, and then order the same product online, free of sales tax.

For Representative Austin Scott, an ardent conservative Republican from Georgia, it’s Ken’s Trading Company, where the profit margin on a Leupold rifle scope is lower than the sales tax too many Georgians are avoiding by shopping for the same scope on their computers.

”We respect their opinion. I’m glad they’re there as conservatives,” Mr. Scott said of the antitax groups. ”But the fact of matter is, in the end we have a job to do.”

For opponents of the bill, the impotence of the antitax arguments has been a revelation.

”I don’t think any one group drives an issue. It’s the issue itself,” said Senator Kelly Ayotte, Republican of New Hampshire, whose state is one of five with no sales taxes. ”What does surprise me, put aside the groups for a minute, is that there are people who describe themselves as conservatives who are going to support this act, when regardless of how you look at it, whether your state has a sales tax or not, it’s going to put some fairly rigorous and onerous requirements on online businesses to collect taxes for other states. That’s counter to conservative principles.”

The Internet sales tax is not the first battle such groups have lost, but it might be one of the clearest. In 2010, just before all of the Bush-era tax cuts were first set to expire, President Obama and Senate Republican negotiators reached agreement to extend all of the tax cuts for two years, except one.

The estate tax had actually expired. Rather than have it reborn at the relatively high top rate of Bill Clinton‘s era, negotiators allowed it to come back at a considerably lower rate. It was still a tax increase from zero, but not as big as it could have been. Mr. Norquist blessed it.

He took his argument even further this year when all those tax cuts expired again. This time, Mr. Obama insisted that tax rates rise considerably on upper-income families’ wages, estates, capital gains and dividends. Almost all Republicans saw that as a tax increase, and a big one, but Mr. Norquist—seeing that passage was inevitable—again declared that the deal did not violate his group’s no-new-taxes pledge since letting all the tax cuts expire would be worse.

This time, Mr. Norquist and other conservatives are not mincing words. Heritage Action predicted that the Internet bill would usher in ”tax audits from hell” for online retailers who could be subject to scrutiny from taxing authorities all over the country at year’s end.

The Heritage Foundation e-mailed to members its 10 reasons to oppose the bill, contending ”it will hobble the Internet economy,” erode ”state sovereignty,” force ”small businesses to become tax collectors for other states” and unleash ”all the nation’s tax collectors on small businesses.”

Mr. Blunt grimaced at such assertions and recalled an interview he did with a television reporter in St. Louis. After the cameras were turned off, the reporter told him of his wife’s friend and her bridal store—which for many customers has turned into a showroom to try out the wares before buying them online.

”They use the parking lot. They use the sidewalk. They benefit from police protection, and then the local merchant who pays for all of that doesn’t get the sale,” he said, suggesting that the groups’ angry opposition in Washington could prove to be something of a watershed with Republicans.

Mr. Scott said he was in no way ready to renounce his support of the taxpayer pledge, but on this one, he has made his choice: ”I’m a co-signer of the pledge. I’m a co-signer of the legislation. We have to collect the taxes that are due.”

 

How to build a second American century / Richard Haass Wall Street Journal

Richard N. Haass is president of the Council on Foreign Relations and the author of “Foreign Policy Begins at Home: The Case for Putting America’s House in Order.” Follow him on Twitter:@RichardHaass

 

 

It was in 1941 that Henry Luce exhorted his countrymen to eschew isolationism, enter the war and make the 20th century the first great American century. Fulfilling his vision, the United States managed a historic trifecta, prevailing in two world wars and the subsequent Cold War.

If Luce were alive today, he would no doubt be tempted to urge his fellow citizens to make the 21st century the second great American century. This one, however, would focus not on winning ideological struggles and thwarting totalitarian bids for dominance, but on creating meaningful rules and international arrangements to contend with the defining challenges of the era: climate change, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, infectious and non-communicable diseases, trade and investment protectionism, terrorism and providing for the 9 billion people who will soon inhabit this planet.

This notion of a second American century may seem bizarre, given the United States’ obvious domestic troubles — from poor schools and crumbling infrastructure to mounting debt and low economic growth — and its external challenges, including terrorism, a rising China, an antagonistic North Korea that has nuclear weapons and an equally hostile Iran that appears to want them.

Nevertheless, we could already be in the second decade of another American century. Here are six reasons:

To start, the United States is and will remain for some time first among unequals. This country boasts the world’s largest economy; its annual GDP of almost $16 trillion is nearly one-fourth of global output. Compare this figure with $7 trillion for China and $6 trillion for Japan. Per capita GDP in the United States is close to $50,000, somewhere between six and nine times that of China.

The United States also has the world’s most capable armed forces. No other country comes close to competing with it on the modern battlefield. Even with the sequester, core U.S. defense spending of some $500 billion is greater than that of the next 10 countries combined. The American qualitative military edge will be around for a long, long time.

Second, there is no peer competitor on the horizon. Yes, China has been growing fast, and the day will come when its GDP equals or passes that of the United States. But that day will arrive later than many forecast, as Chinese growth is slowing. In addition, China’s ability to translate its increasing wealth into power and influence is constrained by a deteriorating natural environment, an enormous and aging population, burgeoning social needs, and a political system far less dynamic than the economy and society it seeks to control.

Nor is any other major power in a position to challenge the United States. Despite a collective economy slightly larger than that of the United States and a population surpassing 500 million, the European Union punches far below its weight in the world as a result of its parochialism, pronounced anti-military culture, and unresolved tensions between nationalism and the commitment to building a collective union. Europe also faces prolonged low economic growth.

Japan, meanwhile, is saddled with a large debt — approximately 200 percent of GDP — whilerestrictive immigration policies deny the country an opportunity not just to increase its population and lower its average age, but to obtain new ideas and talent. The nation is also limited by political parties that are more like personal fiefdoms and the burden of a history that makes most of its neighbors wary of any Japanese reemergence as a political and military power.

Russia will also continue to be held back by its politics. It is hobbled by corruption and is more an oligarchy than a democracy, though the possibility exists for large-scale popular protests, a “Moscow Spring” that would challenge the legitimacy and durability of the regime. Russia also has a mostly one-dimensional economy, more influenced by government than markets, that depends on oil, gas and minerals.

 

In short, the alleged other great powers are not all that great. None has the means to overthrow the existing order and, at least as important, none is committed to doing so. Each is largely preoccupied with its own economic, social and political problems. This is the third reason the century could turn out well for Americans.

The final reason to be upbeat about the prospects for a new American century is the potential to return to high rates of economic growth. The country’s post-World War ll average is slightly above 3 percent, impressive for an advanced economy and well above the current pace. The United States can get back to this level or even surpass it because of the world-class quality of much American higher education, the availability of capital for business start-ups, a legal system that encourages risk and does not unduly penalize failure, and a culture of innovation. 

There is nothing inevitable, however, about American sway over this young center. The advantages this country enjoys are neither permanent nor sufficient to ensure continued primacy. 

So, what needs doing? A partial list includes fixing broken public schools, repairing or replacing aged infrastructure, modernizing immigration policy, reforming health care, negotiating new trade accords, lowering corporate taxes, reining in spending on entitlements, and reducing debt as a share of GDP. Abroad, it includes resisting wars of choice where the interests at stake are less than vital and where there are alternatives to the use of force. This would also mean accepting that we cannot remake other societies in our image.

What stands in the way of the next American century is American politics. To paraphrase Walter Kelly’s Pogo, we have met the problem, and we are it. Special interests often crowd out the general national interest. Partisanship can be healthy, but not when it leads to an inability to govern and to make difficult choices.

Either we resolve our political dysfunction, rethink our foreign policy and restore the foundations of American power — and in the process provide another century of American leadership — or we fail. The alternative to a U.S.-led 21st century is not an era dominated by China or anyone else, but rather a chaotic time in which regional and global problems overwhelm the world’s collective will and ability to meet them.

Americans would not be safe or prosperous in such a world. One Dark Ages was one too many; the last thing we need is another.

president@cfr.org

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Black and White Proms?

 

curtis thumbnailMary C. Curtis, an award-winning multimedia journalist in Charlotte, N.C., has worked at The New York Times, Charlotte Observer and as national correspondent for Politics Daily. Follow her on Twitter: @mcurtisnc3

Was the play list at the segregated “white prom” for Wilcox County High School in Georgia scrubbed of any Beyonce or Rihanna? Was Drake dropped? And what about Justin Timberlake? The superstar credits black artists as role models for his music and moves. Since he’s white, I suppose cuts from his hit “The 20/20 Experience” could pass, as long as they didn’t feature a guest vocal by Jay Z.

 Students from Wilcox County High School who fought to have an integrated prom. (Screengrab from a video by WSAV)

Actually, if I could have scored a ticket to that private, invitation-only event, I’m sure the aural experience would differ little from that at the school’s first “integrated” prom last weekend, organized by a diverse circle of friends. The four young ladies – two black and two white — were frustrated by the color line drawn years ago and maintained for the sake of tradition, according to those who continued it year after year and defend it even now. Those defenders say separate proms for blacks and whites are not about race at all, but different tastes in music and dancing.

Wayne McGuinty, a furniture store owner and City Council member, who is white, told theNew York Times he had donated to fund-raising events for separate proms in the past. He said they don’t reflect racism, just different traditions and tastes, and he used as an example his own 1970s high school years, when separate proms featured rock or country music. “This whole issue has been blown out of proportion,” he said. “Nobody had a problem with having two proms until it got all this publicity.”

But that’s not true. The reason it got publicity was that people did have a problem with the situation, young people who socialized together and didn’t see any reason to split up on this important evening in their high school lives.

If parties were based on musical tastes alone, as McGuinty’s rather shaky excuse maintains, race wouldn’t enter into it, unless he’s saying a black person is not allowed to like a little Blake Shelton now and then and a white kid must abhor Usher. Considering viewers regularly watch the two men spar on NBC’s “The Voice,” along with Shakira and Adam Levine, I’d say McGuinty and other “white prom” supporters are living in a past that never really existed – one where races and culture remain pure and separate. It’s hard to believe McGuinty never attempted his own version of the electric slide at a wedding reception or boogied down to a disco medley.

Pop culture in America has always broken rules and crossed lines authorities created to keep races apart. Jazz, a uniquely American art form, could not have been created without a fusion of cultures. There has been pushback, too, with denunciations from 1950s adults who saw racial subversion and contamination in Elvis’s hips and Little Richard’s shouts, and their grown-up children who just don’t “get” hip-hop.

It’s “those crazy kids” in Wilcox County who led the way. Though some dissenters ripped down posters advertising their all-are-welcome event, the publicity about their efforts, which included a barbecue to raise money, drew attention, financial support and volunteer disc jockeys from Atlanta and Texas. They no doubt spun a variety of tunes with a beat that was easy to dance to.

Unsaid, of course, in the convoluted reasons justifying two proms in 2013 is the notion that kept school social events separate long after Southern classrooms integrated. Some of the denunciations in the 1950s, as well as before and after, were about blacks and whites not only dancing to the music but also dancing together, and what that could lead to.

Well, with a president of the United States– with one black parent and one white parent–now in his second term in the White House, that’s an issue that’s settled, as well.

 

curtis thumbnailMary C. Curtis, an award-winning multimedia journalist in Charlotte, N.C., has worked at The New York Times, Charlotte Observer and as national correspondent for Politics Daily. Follow her on Twitter: @mcurtisnc3

The Mom Vivant / The Hormone Horoscope

The Mom Vivant / The Hormone Horoscope

You have to pity men who like their women feminine but are thrown for a total loop by the hormones that keep us that way! Now along comes an App that a lot of them are buying from Itunes as a way of hedging their bets. Is it a fat day? Is she going to cry if you look at her the wrong way? Is she going to snap at something you said, however well intentioned? Well, now, at the touch of a button, you can dial into the hormone horoscope. It’s an app available on Itunes. Think of it like a mood ring, only much more accurate, according to users. And their loved ones 🙂 

Mood Horoscope by Mark Erdmann 

Mood Horoscope isn’t your everyday horoscope! It uses the most up-to-date scientific research on hormones to predict your moods, food cravings, energy levels, productivity, sex life, and even the strength of your immune system. Live your best life according to your hormones!

HIGHLIGHTS
– 100% free daily horoscope for each day of your cycle
– New Weight Loss Pack with diet and fitness tips tailored to your hormone levels!
– Many women tell us it’s scary how accurate the predictions are
– Men also use the app to better understand their girlfriends/wives
– Includes practical tips for making the best of your day
– Easy to use, with a beautiful, colorful design
– Horoscopes written by a woman for women, based on scientific research

HOW IT WORKS
Start by entering the first day of your last period. That’s it! Every day, you’ll get a new horoscope based on the day of your cycle. It’s all about rising and falling Estrogen and Progesterone levels throughout the month. Modern science has shown these hormones have a huge impact on every area of a woman’s life, but women of course have known this all along! Mood Horoscope assumes an average 28 Day cycle, with ovulation on Day 14. You might not be on this exact schedule, but the general pattern will be the same (plus or minus a few days). Please email us if you have any questions – tatiana@mobilecurious.com.

WHAT WOMEN ARE SAYING
Mood Horoscope gets rave reviews! Here are just a few pieces of feedback we’ve received:

Amazing 
“I got this app for my wife since she doesn’t have an iPhone. She loves it. It’s super simple to use and she is loving knowing how her hormones affect her mood on a daily basis.” — Chrismanfrank 

So validating! 
“This app is brilliant, it helps my body make complete sense and in only a very short time I am so much more aware of what is happening for me in a hormonal sense. Thanks to this app I have been able to cut myself some slack on those low hormone days leading up to my period. Wonderful!” — Ms_Belsey 

Great app! 
“The mood horoscopes I get are surprisingly detailed and accurate. I set mine to push my horoscope every morning. It is a great was to start the day! Simple, fun, and interesting!” — Lhbf

What’s New in Version 1.42

– Fix for a notifications bug.
– Name change! A trademark was filed for the name “Hormone Horoscope” and we don’t have the resources to license the name. We are so thankful for your support, and we hope you like the new name. We’ll have more exciting updates coming soon. 🙂

…More

Screenshots

iPhone Screenshot 1
iPhone Screenshot 2
iPhone Screenshot 3
iPhone Screenshot 4

Customer Reviews

Love it!!! 
     

by Tortle58

I really love this app but I wish there was a way to change the length of your cycle…. It would make a difference in your horoscope making it more accurate 😉

Spot on 
     

by Harry Bergeron

I usually just go by how my body feels but its nice to know what it’s actually doing during the cycle.

Great way to start my day 
     

by weens11

This app is accurate. Love it.

Mood Horoscope

Mood Horoscope isn’t your everyday horoscope! It uses the most up-to-date scientific research on hormones to predict your moods, food cravings, energy levels, productivity, sex life, and even the strength of your immune system. Live your best life according to your hormones!

HIGHLIGHTS
– 100% free daily horoscope for each day of your cycle
– New Weight Loss Pack with diet and fitness tips tailored to your hormone levels!
– Many women tell us it’s scary how accurate the predictions are
– Men also use the app to better understand their girlfriends/wives
– Includes practical tips for making the best of your day
– Easy to use, with a beautiful, colorful design
– Horoscopes written by a woman for women, based on scientific research

HOW IT WORKS
Start by entering the first day of your last period. That’s it! Every day, you’ll get a new horoscope based on the day of your cycle. It’s all about rising and falling Estrogen and Progesterone levels throughout the month. Modern science has shown these hormones have a huge impact on every area of a woman’s life, but women of course have known this all along! Mood Horoscope assumes an average 28 Day cycle, with ovulation on Day 14. You might not be on this exact schedule, but the general pattern will be the same (plus or minus a few days). Please email us if you have any questions – tatiana@mobilecurious.com.

WHAT WOMEN ARE SAYING
Mood Horoscope gets rave reviews! Here are just a few pieces of feedback we’ve received:

Amazing 
“I got this app for my wife since she doesn’t have an iPhone. She loves it. It’s super simple to use and she is loving knowing how her hormones affect her mood on a daily basis.” — Chrismanfrank 

So validating! 
“This app is brilliant, it helps my body make complete sense and in only a very short time I am so much more aware of what is happening for me in a hormonal sense. Thanks to this app I have been able to cut myself some slack on those low hormone days leading up to my period. Wonderful!” — Ms_Belsey 

Great app! 
“The mood horoscopes I get are surprisingly detailed and accurate. I set mine to push my horoscope every morning. It is a great was to start the day! Simple, fun, and interesting!” — Lhbf

 

Customer Reviews
Love it!!! 
     

by Tortle58

I really love this app but I wish there was a way to change the length of your cycle…. It would make a difference in your horoscope making it more accurate 😉

Spot on 
     
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I usually just go by how my body feels but its nice to know what it’s actually doing during the cycle.

Great way to start my day      

by weens11

This app is accurate. Love it.

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Teen who led police on hi-speed chase says he was rushing to get to his prom

One writer’s opinion of where Obamacare stands right now

By David Brooks of the New York Times

It was always going to be difficult to implement Obamacare, but even fervent supporters of the law admit that things are going worse than expected. Implementation got off to a bad start because the Obama administration didn’t want to release unpopular rules before the election. Regulators have been working hard but are clearly overwhelmed, trying to write rules that influence the entire health care sector — an economic unit roughly the size of France. Republicans in Congress have made things much more difficult by refusing to provide enough money for implementation.

By now, everybody involved seems to be in a state of anxiety. Insurance companies are trying to put out new products, but they don’t know what federal parameters they have to meet. Small businesses are angry because the provisions that benefited them have been put on the back burner. Health care systems are highly frustrated. They can’t plan without a road map. Senator Max Baucus, one of the authors of the law, says he sees a “huge train wreck” coming.

I’ve been talking with a bipartisan bunch of health care experts, trying to get a sense of exactly how bad things are. In my conversations with this extremely well-informed group of providers, academics and former government officials, I’d say there is a minority, including some supporters of the law, who think the whole situation is a complete disaster. They predict Obamacare will collapse and do serious damage to the underlying health system.

But the clear majority, including some of the law’s opponents, believe that we’re probably in for a few years of shambolic messiness, during which time everybody will scramble and adjust, and eventually we will settle down to a new normal.

What nobody can predict is how health care chaos will interact with the political system. There’s a good chance that Republicans will be able to use unhappiness with what is already an unpopular law to win back the Senate in 2014. Controlling both houses of Congress, they will be in a good position to alter, though not repeal, the program.

The law’s biggest defenders will then become insurance companies and health care corporations. Having spent billions of dollars adapting to the new system, they are not going to want to see it repealed or replaced.

The experts talk about the problems that lie ahead in cascades. First, there is what you might call the structural cascade. Everything is turning out to be more complicated than originally envisioned. The Supreme Court decision made the Medicaid piece more complicated. The decision by many states not to set up exchanges made the exchange piece more complicated. The lines of accountability between, for example, state and federally run exchanges have grown byzantine and unclear.

A law that was very confusing has become mind-boggling. That could lead people to freeze up. Insurance companies will hesitate before venturing into state exchanges, thereby limiting competition and choice. Americans are just going to be overwhelmed and befuddled. Many are just going to stay away, even if they are eligible for benefits.

Then there is the technical cascade. At some point, people are going to sit at computers and enroll. If the data process looks like some 1990s glitchmonster, if information doesn’t flow freely, then the public opinion hit will be catastrophic.

Then there is the cost cascade. Nearly everybody not in the employ of the administration agrees this law does not solve the cost problem, and many of the recent regulatory decisions will send costs higher. A study in California found that premiums could increase by an average of 20 percent for people not covered by federal subsidies. A study by the Society of Actuaries found that by 2017 costs could rise by 32 percent for insurers covering people in the individual exchanges, and as high as 80 percent in states like Ohio.

Then there is the adverse selection cascade. Under the law, young healthy people subsidize poorer, sicker and older people. But the young may decide en masse that it is completely irrational for them to get health insurance that subsidizes others while they are healthy. They’ll be better off paying the fines, if those are even enforced, and opting out. Without premiums from the young, everybody else’s costs go up even higher.

Then there is the provider concentration cascade. The law further incentivizes a trend under way: the consolidation of hospitals, doctors’ practices and other providers. That also boosts prices.

Over all, it seems likely that in some form or another Obamacare is here to stay. But the turmoil around it could dominate politics for another election cycle, and the changes after that — to finally control costs, to fix the mind-boggling complexities and the unintended consequences — will never end.

Regulatory regimes can be simple and dumb or complex and sprawling. When you build complex, it takes a while to work through the consequences. 

 

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Doctors attack high cost cancer drugs 

Can Antibiotics Make You Fat? Tom Philpott

 

Like hospital patients, US farm animals tend to be confined to tight spaces and dosed with antibiotics. But that’s where the similarities end. Hospitals dole out antibiotics to save lives. On America’s factory-scale meat farms, the goal is to fatten animals for their date at the slaughterhouse.

And it turns out that antibiotics help with the fattening process. Back in the 1940s, scientists discovered that regular low doses of antibiotics increased “feed efficiency”—that is, they caused animals to put on more weight per pound of feed. No one understood why, but farmers seized on this unexpected benefit. By the 1980s, feed laced with small amounts of the drugs became de rigueur as US meat production shifted increasingly to factory farms. In 2009, an estimated 80 percent of the antibiotics sold in the United States went to livestock.

This year, scientists may have finally figured out why small doses of antibiotics “promote growth,” as the industry puts it: They make subtle changes to what’s known as the “gut microbiome,” the teeming universe populated by billions of microbes that live within the digestive tracts of animals. In recent research, the microbiome has been emerging as a key regulator of health, from immune-related disorders like allergies and asthma to the ability to fight off pathogens.

In an August study published in Nature, a team of New York University researchers subjected mice to regular low doses of antibiotics—just like cows, pigs, and chickens get on factory farms. The result: After seven weeks, the drugged mice had a different composition of microbiota in their guts than the control group—and they had gained 10 to 15 percent more fat mass.

Why? “Microbes in our gut are able to digest certain carbohydrates that we’re not able to,” says NYU researcher and study coauthor Ilseung Cho. Antibiotics seem to increase those bugs’ ability to break down carbs—and ultimately convert them to body fat. As a result, the antibiotic-fed mice “actually extracted more energy from the same diet” as the control mice, he says. That’s great if you’re trying to fatten a giant barn full of hogs. But what about that two-legged species that’s often exposed to antibiotics?

Interestingly, the NYU team has produced another recent paper looking at just that question. They analyzed data from a UK study in the early ’90s to see if they could find a correlation between antibiotic exposure and kids’ weight. The study involved more than 11,000 kids, about a third of whom had been prescribed antibiotics to treat an infection before the age of six months. The results: The babies who had been exposed to antibiotics had a 22 percent higher chance of being overweight at age three than those who hadn’t (though by age seven the effect had worn off).

The connection raises another obvious question: Are we being exposed to tiny levels of antibiotics through residues in the meat we eat—and are they altering our gut flora? It turns out that the Food and Drug Administration maintains tolerance limits for antibiotic residue levels, above which meat isn’t supposed to be released to the public (PDF). But Keeve Nachman, who researches antibiotic use in the meat industry for the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, told me that the FDA sets these limits based solely on research financed and conducted by industry—and it refuses to release the complete data to the public or consider independent research.

“We may not understand the biological relevance of exposures through consuming meat at those levels,” he says. Indeed, a recent European study showed that tiny levels of antibiotics could have an effect on microorganisms. The researchers took some meat, subjected it to antibiotic residues near the US limit, and used a traditional technique to turn it into sausage, inoculating it with lactic-acid-producing bacteria. In normal sausage making, the lactic acid from the starter bacteria spreads through the meat and kills pathogens like E. coli. The researchers found, though, that the antibiotic traces were strong enough to impede the starter bacteria, while still letting the E. coli flourish. In other words, even at very low levels, antibiotics can blast “good” bacteria—and promote deadly germs.

Nachman stressed that we simply don’t have sufficient information to tell whether the meat we eat is messing with our gut microbiome. But, he adds, “It’s not an unreasonable suspicion.” If that’s not enough to churn your stomach, there’s also the fact that drug-resistant bugs—which often emerge in antibiotic-dosed livestock on factory farms—are increasingly common: Remember the super-salmonella that caused Cargill to recall 36 million pounds of ground turkey last year? Luckily for me, it’s unlikely that drug-laced meat will mess with my gut. I think I’ve lost my appetite.